Nutritional Support for Alzheimer's

Published: July 9, 2012

In this small study of 12 patients institutionalized with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, half received nutritional support (folate, vitamin B12, alpha-tocopherol, S-adenosyl methionine, N-acetyl cysteine, and acetyl-L-carnitine) and the other half received a placebo. The rate of decline in the nutritional support group was 30% slower than that in the placebo group. As most medications also only slow Alzheimer's, this is promising. A good multivitamin powder is an easy way to get all of these nutrients and much more!

Efficacy of a Vitamin/Nutriceutical Formulation for Moderate-Stage to Later-Stage Alzheimer's Disease: A Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

Ruth Remington, PhD, Amy Chan, PhD, James Paskavitz, MD, Thomas B. Shea, PhD

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts,, Center for Cell Neurobiology and Neurodegeneration Research, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts

Recent studies demonstrated efficacy of a vitamin/nutriceutical formulation (folate, vitamin B12, alpha-tocopherol, S-adenosyl methionine, N-acetyl cysteine, and acetyl-L-carnitine) for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we tested the efficacy of this formulation in a small cohort of 12 institutionalized patients diagnosed with moderate-stage to later-stage Alzheimer's disease. Participants were randomly separated into therapy or placebo groups. Participants receiving the formulation demonstrated a clinically significant delay in decline in the Dementia Rating Scale and clock-drawing test as compared to those receiving placebo. Institutional caregivers reported approximately 30% improvement in the Neuropyschiatric Inventory and maintenance of performance in the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living for more than 9 months. This formulation holds promise for delaying the decline in cognition, mood, and daily function that accompanies the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and may be particularly useful as a supplement for pharmacological approaches during later stages of this disorder. A larger trial is warranted.


American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias, Vol. 24, No. 1, 27-33 (2009), DOI: 10.1177/1533317508325094

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